The guardians of the temple: Teachers.

Nagasaki and my first Photoshop

My first Photoshopped photo. They say you'll always remember your first time.

My first Photoshopped photo. They say you’ll always remember your first time.

Nagasaki is is one of the two southernmost places in the four islands which make up Japan. It’s blisteringly hot in the summer with unrelenting humidity, unless you went last month. Some of the perks to traveling in the rain are the mild temperature, no sunburn, and perspiration-free. I’ve been to Nagasaki in the summer and I was grateful for the overcast.

Nagasaki was rebut after the war. The city is a mix of the remainders of the rushed post-war architecture, historical buildings which survived the bomb, and The New, all laid out along steep slopes and waterways. There is still a sizable Chinese community there. Along with a grand Chinatown there is the Sofukuji Temple built upon foundations which survived the bombing in 1945. I arrived there just after it opened. Shortly after one of the monks, a young man who was brought over from a rural provence in China, came in to do his morning libations while I was setting up my tripod. We hit it off immediately. He explained everything to do with the temple, told me about his life, and asked that I take his picture — a lot of pictures.

He’s about 155cm and solid muscle. He, along with other monks in China, practice martial arts as part of their training. We played around with my camera for a couple of hours, became Facebook friends, and I was on my way.

I only edited the above pic of him in Photoshop to smooth out his skin. Most everything I could do in Lightroom, including fix some overblown pics from my iPhone.

The main deity within Sofukuji temple, Nagasaki, an ancient king.

I could not decide which I liked better. The main deity within Sofukuji temple, Nagasaki, an ancient king.

nagasaki sofukuji interior

Without increased exposure. The main deity within Sofukuji temple, Nagasaki, an ancient king.

 

temple detail, story engraved into a chest with weapons in the foreground

temple detail, story engraved into a chest with weapons in the foreground

 

A monk in the main temple

A monk in the main temple

 

temple detail, outside

temple detail, outside

 

temple detail, outside

temple detail, outside

 

My friend showing why you need to take a monk seriously.

My friend showing why you need to take a monk seriously.

 

Detail inside the temple

Detail inside the temple

 

summer vacation-1409August 04, 201424 mmISO 100-Edit

 

 

 

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10 Comments on “Nagasaki and my first Photoshop

  1. Pingback: The samurai and the merchant | Made by you and I

  2. Ah – I didn’t miss anything ! 🙂 One presooms the vast bulk of these shots has been PhotoShopped, yes ?
    Easy to comment on the pairing near the top, for to me it shows that bright is not always best. But what the fuck would I know ?!
    As to the rest … being a klutz re these things, I can say only that they all look great to me, Steven. I do particularly like the ‘detail inside the temple’, where that huge carved thing is looming outside threateningly …

    Liked by 1 person

    • A little deception was the idea. 😉

      I’m really glad I’ve learned Lightroom before moving onto Photoshop. Not to blow my horn, but the images out from the camera haven’t been bad at all and just needed color enhancing and sharpening.

      The two of the deity were three minute exposures where I boosted the saturation and luminance levels. I like the darker one, too, but looking at the histogram all the data is on the left and I’m unsure what to do with that information. (Keep the histogram balanced or not.)

      Where Photoshop did come in handy is fixing skin quickly. My friend was pox marked terribly which really showed up as shadows in the lighting. It took hours to work out how to minimize it in Lightroom, but the solution was straightforward in Photoshop. Was your hubby a user, too?

      Like

      • Well, that is impressive.

        I did try a film camera ages and ages and ages ago, but it was just too expensive. He would have had a much more careful eye. I can just shoot a hundred shots and pick the best one. It’s a good analogy for the differences between one generation and the next: One is more thought out than the other.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Gorgeous series!
    RE: Photoshop. My first version was Elements 4. Way back then it came with a book users manual which I still have and use! I’m using CS6 today, but I still feel like a beginner more times than not. It’s a very powerful tool, and does remarkable things. Most of which I’ll never master. The learning curve is steep, but worth the effort. I totally understand your earlier comment about, “needing an Intervention.” Sometimes I can spend days reading and watching tutorials on Photoshop.

    Good luck with your Learning Curve. I do hope the journey is more fun, and rewarding than frustrating. 🙂

    Like

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