Daikon salad, and then some

(FIVE recipes follow) Well, spring is here. Soon I won’t be able to hide. Pre-blog, I was exceptionally organized. I discovered David Allen a decade earlier and his program made all the difference. Blogging — and then photography — introduced unknown unknowns into my life flow and my over-organized world is now piles of ToDo all over my apartment, on my computer, in my Dashboard. What to do? Well, I finally made myself reorganize. I set goals. I made lists. I decided deadlines. I programed automated alarms into my computers to get me… Read More

Eat more fast food! Salmon and Brown Rice.

(recipe follows) Fast food can be from a rice cooker. In the morning before work I set up my rice cooker with 1/2 cup of brown rice and a large pinch of long grain rice. I lay a piece of salmon, a stalk of celery, and some sliced shallots with a bay leaf. One cup of water and a jigger of dry Vermouth, set the rice cooker to turn on at 11:30 and I’m off — I have to make money to cook. Just before I get back my apartment fills with… Read More

Tofu Steak with Sautéed Enoki Mushrooms

(recipe follows) Shortly after I arrived in Japan I met my new best friend turned roommate, Shawn. At that time, just after university, we were each earning between five and six thousand USD per month teaching English. We had a four-bedroom apartment in Sapporo, Roller Blades, free-time and lots of greenery — life was good. It was spring, hormones were high and Shawn was crushing on a pretty girl with waist length raven hair. The weight pulled her head back so she walked deliberately, with total control. She agreed to a dinner… Read More

Daikon Steak

(recipe follows) I was watching a Japanese cooking program many years ago in which a wizened chef placed six thick slices of daikon in a large cast iron skillet filled with hot olive oil and cooked them until they browned, which took over an hour. My thighs expand just remembering it. A quick lunch or supper for me borrows from his idea. I lightly coat the bottom of the pan in sesame or olive oil and fry boiled daikon on high until the bottoms brown, between five to ten minutes depending on… Read More

Daikon and tofu steaks with sautéed mushrooms and leek

Simple and easy to make the whole meal has fewer than 400 calories and can be made fat-free. This post will link to the recipes tomorrow, sorry M. R. 😉 For Daikon steak, click here. For Tofu steak, click here.

The Kim Chi Department

Living near Tokyo means Seoul is a day trip. I was in Seoul last May to visit a friend for hanami, do a little shopping, and eat. The most prestigious department store in South Korea is a massive 12 story chunk of architecture named Lotte. Their food department is kinetic, laid out to show how much you’re spending and pulse you through the whole floor. Each pristine display has a salesperson fitted to the task. Toothsome young ladies in Confectionary, delicate women in Fruits, dishy old broads in Kim-Chi — I confess, I completely… Read More

Play with your food! — Dosa Your Way

I poured Dosa batter into a waffle iron and set it to high. Ten minutes later -- beep, beep, beep -- and it was on a plate. Coconut chutney is usually served much, much thinner, but I wanted to see how the thicker texture would fill the gaps.

I wanted something different for lunch, but my refrigerator is filled with leftovers. To add variety I changed the approach to something typical by using different tools: I used an American waffle maker to make an Indian dosa (link to recipe) — and it was perfect. Crisp on the outside, it gave way with a loud, satisfying crunch. Inside was the flavour of urad dal. If I had added a thinner coconut chutney, it might have made this particular Dosa soft, muted the urad dal flavour, and required a knife and fork.

Play with your food! — Bindaettok Your Way

Bindaettok made in a waffle iron with kim chi, corn, and mixed greens.

Since I had the waffle iron out I took the last of my Bindaettok (link to recipe), mixed in a few odds and end taking space in the salad crisper and poured the batter into the machine. It steamed like a locomotive and took close to 20 minutes to finish. It was crunchy without having used any oil. The spices in the batter from the kim-chi (link to recipe) were aromatic and it tasted very good, kind of like a chip. However, I was already full from the dosa and could only finish half…. Read More

Bindaettok

I layer vegetables in my kim-chi jar so that as I progress I always have something new to eat.

By soaking the beans overnight you can have a healthy meal (link to recipe and tutorial) in ten minutes with as few a three ingredients. You can also make kim chi (link to recipe and tutorial).

mung bean pancakes, bindaettok, and skills every cook should know

Lunch in ten minutes Bindaetteok with home made kim-chi.

(The recipe is at the bottom of this post.) As I mentioned in my Quiche Epiphany, I contracted vegetarianism when I was 14. Unchecked, it grew into full blown veganism by 21. International travel cured me: It’s hard to be picky when your abroad — even less so way back when, but I still love vegetarian and vegan foods. My guide when I was 14 was Recipes For A Small Planet. The only foods I had the skill to prepare were bean burgers — for years I ate bean burgers not knowing… Read More

A week of ten minute recipes

boiled daikon, first step

I’m new to blogging. To get my bearings I’ve been read, read, reading blogs. A constant theme in the food-o-sphere is ‘quick and easy’. Myself, I prefer slow and complicated; but delicious, inexpensive, healthful food is easy to prepare at home and so I’ve decided to do a series of posts in which I make meals in no more than 10 minutes — preparation is required. I spent two hours preparing last Friday and no more than 10 minutes each day throughout the week. (Links to my recipes will follow in the… Read More

Zero To Hero, Day 12: Fermenting, part one

(For a tutorial and recipe for Kim Chi please click the link)   I’ve made my own yogurts and buttermilk for a decade. Last summer I noticed the word “konbuchya” — which has a very different meaning in Japanese — coming up a lot online. The long and short is that I started thinking about fermentation in the home kitchen. I bought a few books, read the personal experiences from many, many bloggers and went shopping on Amazon.co.jp. By November I was ready. I prepared 3 litres of sauerkraut, 5 litres of… Read More