Idli

  Idli is not originally an Indian dish, but an import to India — I’m full of trivia. ­čÖé When I was at CII idli was not on the menu, so to speak. A fermented mixture of beans and rice, steamed, then served with chutney or sambar, idli is a home cooked dish which you can sometime find out. Idli batter follows the same steps as dosa, but idli is steamed rather than cooked on a hot griddle. There is what’s called an idli steamer you can purchase to make the standard… Read More

sarson ka saag (recipe)

I came across a recipe online many years ago for a curry of mustard greens. By chance mustard greens were in season and I bought them not for onigiri, as the Japanese use them, but for Sarson Ka Saag.┬áSince then I’ve sampled dozens of recipes, which don’t vary much. Mustard greens aren’t popular here, so when they come into season I buy them in bulk to freeze. I stem them and blanch the stemmed leaves from the stems separately. I prepare the dish with the tender parts of the leaves for guests… Read More

Tomato Tart Tatin with goats cheese, fresh herbs and a Bloody Mary Granita

Originally posted on ice cream magazine:
? ┬á┬á The wedding of a widowed osteopath marrying a biochemist. He being a first timer, an amateur ventriloquist, an amputee. Creepy Church, begat an organist, a burly lass with a grimacing face, huge bouffant hair, who wore wall to wall tartan. She entered the Church carrying a large, purple velvet goat, her music case, quite obviously? “Conspicuously absent isn’t he?” “Oh, where’s the Groom.” “There’s a wildly held belief that the Groom should be in attendance” said a loud buffoon. Another hooray heckler boomed “There’s…

Pepper prelude poll

(poll is at the bottom) There’s a place near the park which procures prodigious produce for purchase. The other week they had a bumper crop of yellow and red bell peppers, pound for pound cheaper than per pepper — so I bought a bunch to prepare. Peeled they were perfect peppers for stuffing. ­čÖé These are some shots from one plating enhanced through Lightroom. Everywhere I keep reading that there are no rules on artistic choices. Well, I think there are some underlying principles on what makes a good image or edit,… Read More

Stock, generic recipe (with sous vide pictures)

Warm your home during the cooler days, or fill a pot with the bight, crisp flavors of summer by making homemade stocks. Anything you make from it will be enhanced.┬á Myself, I enjoy the day long process of tending a near boiling pot, of skimming, of straining and adding then straining again; but the Modernists have popularized two other methods for producing stock faster with less effort: Those made with a pressure cooker and Those made sealed in a plastic bag then cooked in a hot water bath (sous vide). Whatever the… Read More

Sarson Ka Saag

NAPP - Lightroom 5 Killer Tips by Scott Kelby

Day two of Lightroom. More than the editing tool I’m finding that the catalog function is extremely useful. After importing the photos you can add key words and then create folders to filter through key words. The initial set up is gong to take time, but once it’s done it’ll be easy to find my photos. Does anyone have any suggestions on improving this image? I was thinking the increase the exposure, but the whites might blow out. I need to do a recipe. Coming soon one of my favorite Indian foods… Read More

Summer heat

Summer in Japan. I grew up with heat waves above 100 degrees (38 degrees Celsius) and next to no humidity, so I appreciate the relatively cool and very moist heat over the Tokyo summer. Snow cones are the popular treat here. Called kakigori, vendors are around every major park. Everyone loves a snow cone. Those that don’t, well, they can chill with a beer wherever they like.

Play with your food! Savory Cauliflower Bites

(recipe follows) I was going to call them truffles. It just sounds better, doesn’t it? When someone asks what you had for lunch Cauliflower Balls doesn’t have the same panache. Looking for middle ground, I decided Cauliflower Bites captures what these are nicely. I got the idea from here from Molecular Recipes.┬áChef Digilio’s idea involves making a truffle from cream and garlic and coating them in bread crumbs. I tried it and the texture was wonderful — they melt in your mouth, unexpected for something savory. I rolled half of hs garlic… Read More

Vegetable Curry, a book and recipe

vegetable curry

(recipe follows) Several years ago the love of my life, Hiro, gave me an unexpected birthday present: A curry cookbook written in both Japanese and English. Until then I had never made Indian food — curry had just never occurred to me. He didn’t know me that well at the time but mine is the personality that when I do something, I devote myself to it and so I bought every single ingredient in the index from Asafoetida┬áto Yogurt and went to work page by page, which created some friction in our… Read More

Chocolate Rye Crackers

I came across a blog awhile back that featured rye crackers. I have stoneground whole rye in the pantry and got it into my head to make crackers with it. While I respect his recipe, I wanted something different. I went online to foodpairing.com and did some research on what pairs well with rye flour. I made a list of the ingredients I wanted to use — cocoa nibs, apples, brown sugar, caraway, black olives, lard, mustard, olive oil — and went to work. I went with three flavor pairings, the best… Read More

Candied Pumpkin Pie

You can candy most anything with slight adjustments for the fruit or vegetable. It all starts with an idea of what you’d like to do with the finished product. Here we have candied kabochya, a Japanese pumpkin, much denser than the American varieties. Here, I simply sliced the pumpkin and put it in a plastic ziplock bag with leftover orange syrup for two weeks. I did this to show you how hands free candying can be. During that two weeks, twice I poured the syrup into a pot and boiled it for… Read More

Apple Strudel Your Way!

(recipe follows — red text areas are links) I started working with Filo shortly after starting this blog (you might remember some of the teaser posts). I couldn’t bring myself to publish anything I’d written. I was unsatisfied with the pictures I took and unsure how to present filo dough in a way which would peak your interest, especially as an undeserved reputation as being difficult to work with. Filo needs just three ingredients: Flour, fat, water. To that you can add salt for flavor or stevia for sweetness. The principles for… Read More